26/02/2022

Security Testing: DAST, SAST, and IAST

When it comes to security testing, there are three types of tests to choose from static application security testing (SAST), dynamic application security testing (DAST), and interactive application security testing (IAST). But what are these methods? And which one should you use for your business? In this blog post, we will discuss the differences between SAST, DAST, and IAST, and help you decide which one is right for you.

Security Testing DAST SAST and IAST

What Is SAST?


SAST is a security testing method that uses static analysis to identify vulnerabilities in applications. Static analysis means that the code is analyzed without actually running it. This type of analysis can be done during the development process before the application goes into production. Unlike static code analysis tools, which check for defects in source programs or executables, DAST systems look for such issues as SQL injection, cross-site scripting (XSS), and buffer overflows in program logic or binaries.

What Is DAST?


DAST is a security testing method that uses dynamic analysis to identify vulnerabilities in applications. Dynamic analysis means that the code is executed, and the tester monitors how the application behaves. This type of analysis can be done during the development process, before the application goes into production, or even while it’s live on a production server. DAST tools scan web applications for vulnerabilities like SQL injection, cross-site scripting (XSS), and buffer overflows by simulating an attack on the application itself.

What Is IAST?


IAST is a security testing method that uses interactive analysis to identify vulnerabilities in applications. Interactive analysis means that the code is executed while it’s being tested, so there are two processes running at once: one process runs the application under test and another analyzes how it behaves when interacting with other components or systems in real-time. This type of analysis can be done during development, before deployment into production, or even after deployment via monitoring services like New Relic APM Pro.

Which Category Does Penetration Testing Fall In?


Penetration testing (software penetration testing) falls under the category of dynamic application security testing (DAST). It is a security test that simulates an attack on your web application by using real tools like Burp Suite or OWASP ZAP to identify vulnerabilities in applications. This type of analysis can be done during development before deployment into production, after deployment via monitoring services like New Relic APM Pro, or even while it’s live on a production server through continuous scanning with software solutions from companies like Astra Security. The goal is not only to detect vulnerabilities but also to exploit them to get a better understanding of how attackers can compromise your system.

The Differences Between SAST, DAST, And IAST


The primary distinctions between static application security testing, dynamic application security testing, and interactive application security testing (IAST) are based on how they examine an app's source code or binaries. Static analysis is done without running any part of the software under test; dynamic analysis requires executing some parts while monitoring their behaviour in real-time; interactive analysis allows you to execute everything at once as if it were on production servers so there's no need for separate deployments just yet.

Pros And Cons Of DAST, SAST, and IAST


Each of these application security testing methods has its own set of pros and cons. Let’s take a look at each one:

Static Analysis Pros:


  • Can be done during the development process, before the application goes into production
  • Scans source code or binaries for potential vulnerabilities
  • Cheaper and faster than dynamic analysis

Static Analysis Cons:


  • Doesn’t detect vulnerabilities that are caused by runtime errors

Dynamic Analysis Pros:


  • Can be done during the development process, before the application goes into production, or even while it’s live on a production server
  • Detects vulnerabilities that are caused by runtime errors

Dynamic Analysis Cons:


  • Scans web applications for vulnerabilities like SQL injection, cross-site scripting (XSS), and buffer overflows by simulating an attack on the application itself

Interactive Analysis Pros:


  • Can be done during development, before deployment into production, or after deployment via monitoring services like New Relic APM Pro.

Interactive Analysis Cons:


  • Doesn't have many cons except that it is a relatively new method of security testing.

Conclusion


The most important thing to consider when choosing which application security testing method is best for your web applications or network infrastructure? Well, it all depends on how soon you want to detect vulnerabilities. And this article talks all about DAST which will enable you to make a well-informed decision.
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Hi, I’m Ghanendra Yadav, SEO Expert, Professional Blogger, Programmer, and UI Developer. Get a Solution of More Than 500+ Programming Problems, and Practice All Programs in C, C++, and Java Languages. Get a Competitive Website Solution also Ie. Hackerrank Solutions and Geeksforgeeks Solutions. If You Are Interested to Learn a C Programming Language and You Don't Have Experience in Any Programming, You Should Start with a C Programming Language, Read: List of Format Specifiers in C.
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